Hawaii Car Window Tint Laws (Updated)

Car tint laws vary from state to state. If you plan to install tint on your car in Hawaii, you may be wondering what the car tint laws are in Hawaii?

Quick Answer

In Hawaii, the car tint laws are as follows:

  • Front Windshield – no tint except above the AS-1 line or four inches below the top of the windshield if no AS-1 line is present.
  • Front side windows – Must allow 35% or more light transmittance, ± 6%.
  • Rear side windows & rear windshield – must allow 35% or more light transmittance, ± 6%.

To avoid a fine, you’ll want to make sure your windows are tinted within the correct range. We’ll break down each window so you can avoid the headache!

Window Tinting in Hawaii – What Does the Law Say?

Hawaii has a pretty straightforward window tint law. Let’s take a look at each window and see if there are any exemptions to the rule.

Can Windows Be Tinted in Hawaii?

So, are windows even allowed to be tinted in Hawaii? Here’s what the law has to say:

Front windshield cannot: The front windshield must be clear and non-reflective. The only exception to this is the space above the AS-1 line, which is designated by the manufacturer of the vehicle or windshield. If your vehicle does not have an AS-1 line, the law states that tint can be applied in a 4-inch strip at the top of the windshield.

Other windows can be tinted: The windows immediately left and right of the driver, as well as the rear side windows and rear windshield, can be tinted to a certain degree. Vans, minivans, trucks, and buses are exempt from this as long as they are equipped with rearview mirrors on both sides of the vehicle.

What Windows Can Be Tinted in Hawaii?

Hawaii is a pretty sunny island, so it’s no surprise that many people want tint on their windows that helps block harmful rays from the sun. In Hawaii, all windows except the front windshield can be tinted, but the windows can only be tinted to a certain percentage of light transmittance.

Front Windshield: The front windshield of all vehicles registered in Hawaii must be clear and non-reflective. No tint is allowed except above the AS-1 line of the vehicle. Above this line, there are no tint restrictions or regulations. If your vehicle does not have an AS-1 line, Hawaii law states that a 4-inch strip below the top of the windshield is allowed to be tinted.

Back Windshield: In the state of Hawaii, the rear windshield of your vehicle may be tinted. However, it must allow 35% or more light transmittance. The law gives a little leeway, stating that this tint can be plus or minus 6%. So, technically, if you have a tint of 29% on your rear windshield, you’re still within the legal limit.

Driver & Passenger Windows: The windows to the immediate left and right of the driver are allowed to be tinted. They must allow 35% or more light transmittance. Similar to the back windshield, Hawaii law gives you a 6% margin of error, so 29% light transmittance is still legal to drive with.

Back Side Windows: The windows to the rear of the driver and passenger have the same restrictions as the back windshield. They must allow 35% or more light transmittance, ± 6%. Vans, minivans, trucks, and busses are exempt from this and have no tint restrictions as long as they have rearview mirrors on both sides of the vehicle.

Restricted Colors: According to Hawaii’s Title 291 ‘Regulation of motor vehicle sun screening devices,’ there are no restricted tint colors.

Hawaii Window Tint Law Medical Exemption

Some states will allow for darker tint on your vehicle’s windows if you, or someone who frequently drives the vehicle, has a medical condition that makes them sensitive to light.

In the state of Hawaii, medical exemptions are not allowed. Even if you have a medical condition, your windows must adhere to the laws described for everyone else.

Frequently Asked Questions About Hawaii Car Window Tinting Laws

Tint laws can have confusing wording and may not be very clear. Here are answers to some of the most common questions about Hawaii’s car window tinting laws.

What does VLT mean according to Hawaii state law? Hawaii’s law, Title 291-21.5 ‘Regulation of motor vehicle sun screening devices’ does not specify a definition for VLT. In general, VLT refers to visible light transmittance, which is the percentage of light transmitted after sun screening material such as tint is applied.

How much does car window tinting cost in Hawaii? Tinting prices are higher than average in Hawaii. The average cost to tint a four-door sedan is about $368. The price will vary depending on where you live, but the price range typically falls between $336-$399 for tinted windows in Hawaii.

How dark can your windows be in Hawaii? Hawaii has a nice little caveat to the regular window tint law. The front side windows, back side windows, and rear windshield must allow 35% or more light transmittance, but a 6% variance is allowed. The darkest your windows can be is 29% VLT.

Is reflective or colored tint legal in Hawaii? According to Title 291, you cannot have reflective tint on any windows of your vehicle in the state of Hawaii. This makes windows appear metallic or mirrored. However, Hawaii tint laws do not restrict any specific colors in terms of colored tint on your vehicle’s windows.

Do you need a certificate or sticker for your tint? Some states require the business which applies aftermarket tint to give you a certificate that you must have with you in the vehicle. Other states require the business to place a sticker on the tinted windows. Hawaii requires you to have the certificate, but not the sticker.

Can you get a ticket for tinted windows in Hawaii? If you are pulled over and questioned about your car’s tint percentage in Hawaii, you may need to present the certificate from the business where you got it tinted. If it’s found your tint is too low, you can receive a fine of no less than $250 and no more than $500

Wrap Up

To avoid hassle, tickets, and hefty fines, make sure to understand your state’s car tint laws. This will save you time and money in the future!

Leave a Comment